The Curse of Oak Island S07, Ep11 – The Eye of the Storm

Show: The Curse of Oak Island
Season: 7
Episode: 11
Title: The Eye of the Storm
Original Air Date: January 28, 2020


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Synopsis: As they start to dig in the swamp, the team is informed that a category 5 hurricane is heading their way. The winds are over 180mph. It could be really bad if the hurricane directly hits the island. Marty worries a direct hit would turn the rest of the season into a clean up instead of exploration. Back in the swamp, they are digging away. They got a survey stake. Billy continues scraping the swamp at the same depth. They get another survey stake. With the hurricane coming they try and keep digging as long as possible. In Smith’s Cove, Gary and Jack metal detect everything that as been dug up or moved. Gary finds another iron cribbing spike. Gary is saddened that they aren’t find more artificacts from the people who actually dug it. In the money pit, they get another sample to go through. This sample has some wood and is disturbed. In the swamp, the team is trying to expose the pave stone area before hurricane Dorian arrives. As they dig they find a lot of stone. They can also see where water is coming in as well. Marty goes to get the other excavator. They will have to dig a second ditch for the water to drain into. They make enough space in a ditch to get the pump going to drain it. At the money pit, they are trying to go through core samples as quickly as possible. They are quickly moving and at depth of 106 feet its axe cut wood. They can confirm it’s not from the Hedden Shaft because the beams aren’t the right dimension and he used a circular saw and this was cut by hand with an axe. They might have found the original money pit as this wood is much older than searcher shafts. Samples will be submitted for tests. The geologist states that they are finding this at a depth that has not been searched at in this area. Gary and Peter take the iron pieces to the blacksmith for examination. He thinks that the odd shaped ones were inserted near a post, the rest were holding up the post. He thinks the materials are from the 1600s or 1700s. He states that these pieces would be used to hold a big wall together. He actually confirms that these items that would also be found in a dock or wall next to water. Back in Smith’s Cove, the hurricane is going to hit in less than 24 hours, so they are working as fast as possible. It’s now a category one hurricane instead of a five, but will still do some major damage. Rick wants to do dendro testing on one of the big timbers. The fact that it’s heading straight for Oak Island has left Marty queasy. Back in the swamp, they make a plan as to what they need to do if the storm doesn’t cause a lot of damage. With it being so close they divide up the tasks that they need to do before the storm hits. In short, any thing that can fly away has to be secured and all the machinery has to be clear of the trees in case it falls down in the storm. The storm hits and the guys are still on the island trying to keep track of damage as it happens. Footage of the storm hitting the island is just shocking. Halifax was heavily damaged. Rick and the project manager go back to the island to assess how bad the damage is. The road onto the island is damaged and they start pounding steaks into the ground to recreate the causeway road to what it was. No heavy equipment can be brought onto the island until this is repaired. Next they head to the swamp, which looks very different and has refilled. It will take days to get the swamp drained again. Tasks get divided up yet again to get everything back on track. Smith’s Cove was not damaged at least. Billy is using an excavator to remove all the broken trees.



Categories: Blog Archive, The Curse of Oak Island

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